The Killer Clown Meets The Candy Man

Serial killers John Wayne Gacy (The Killer Clown) and Dean Corll (The Candy Man) meet in Chicago, run into Charles Manson and plan a murder.

This story, through fictional is based on historical facts derived from interviews and court documents.
The movie stars Edward X Young as Dean Corll, Jeremy Woodworth as Gacy/Pogo the Clown, and Eric Fleising and Seth Leighton Hale as Corll's teenage accomplices Wayne Henley and David Brooks.

  • Pete jacelone
    Director
    Psycho Sisters, Creepy Clowns
  • Pete Jacelone
    Writer
  • Edward X Young
    Writer
  • Pete Jacelone
    Producer
  • Edward X Young
    Producer
  • Edward X Young
    Key Cast
    “Dean Corll”
  • Jeremy Woodworth
    Key Cast
    “John Gacy/Pogo the Clown”
  • Eric Fleising
    Key Cast
    “Wayne Henley”
  • Seth Leighton Hale
    Key Cast
    “David Brooks”
  • John Link
    Key Cast
    “Charles Manson”
  • Film Type:
    Feature
  • Runtime:
    1 hour 35 minutes
  • Completion Date:
    October 31, 2018
  • Production Budget:
    25,000 USD
  • Country of Origin:
    United States
  • Country of Filming:
    United States
  • Film Language:
    English
  • Film Color:
    Color
  • First-time Filmmaker:
    No
  • Student Project:
    No
Director Biography - Pete jacelone

Pete Jacelone was born in 1953. He is a writer, producer, director and editor. His first film was Psycho Sisters (1998), which he co-produced and directed. He is also known for producing and directing The Erotic Mirror (2002), Sculpture (2009), Creepy Clowns: The Lunatic'ler (2016), Chad's Dental Nightmare (2017), Derek's 13 Nightmares, and most recently, The Killer Clown Meets The Candy Man (2018).

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Director Statement

This film is probably the most subversive movie I have ever made. The story is about psychopathic killers who meet, talk and share stories of their conquests over drinks. Whereas you and I might discuss sports, or the arts, what do you think a couple of serial killers would talk about?
I am certain their discussions would be nothing less than subversive...and perhaps even a bit perverse.