The Erasure

This thriller film is sort of like 'The Purge', and for one weekend out of the year Black women and girls go missing. This fictional film is inspired from a real statistic, that 64,000 Black and brown women and girls go missing in the United States every year and only a fraction of their cases are investigated. The rules for the Erasure weekend is that there cannot be any police involvement or media coverage of the missing women. In this world there is a 'safe haven', a neighborhood known as Fontier Hills. This year the audience goes on a journey with three Black women that live in this safe haven and shows what happens to them when The Confederate goes beyond their boundaries to capture them.

  • Akeallah Blair
    Director
  • Akeallah Blair
    Writer
  • Akeallah Blair
    Producer
  • Vita Amore
    Producer
    Masks
  • Anna Ogunkunle
    Producer
  • Victor Bouzi
    Producer
  • Steven Christopher
    Key Cast
    “Joshua Livingston”
  • Monica Lawson
    Key Cast
    “Cheryl Livingston”
  • Paige Noel
    Key Cast
    “Shaunie Jackson”
  • Donna Dotson
    Key Cast
    “Dr. Lenae Roberts”
  • Hilary Barraford
    Key Cast
    “Sally Richards”
  • Evie Abat
    Key Cast
    “Dr. Anne Kim”
  • David John- Seltzer
    Key Cast
    “Mr. Mark Strauss”
  • Margaret Newborn
    Key Cast
    “Aunt Shirleen”
  • Ross Britz
    Key Cast
    “Confederate General”
  • Project Type:
    Short
  • Genres:
    thriller, drama
  • Runtime:
    13 minutes 12 seconds
  • Completion Date:
    September 4, 2019
  • Production Budget:
    10,000 USD
  • Country of Origin:
    United States
  • Country of Filming:
    United States
  • Language:
    English
  • Shooting Format:
    Digital
  • Aspect Ratio:
    16:9
  • Film Color:
    Color
  • First-time Filmmaker:
    Yes
  • Student Project:
    No
Director Biography - Akeallah Blair

Akeallah Blair is from the kind hearted city of Sacramento, California. In 1994, she was born to parents Michael Blair and Bayyinah Martin. During her childhood she always pursued the arts in: theater, dance, painting, photography and finally filmmaking. She first began making films in middle school through a video production class. Due to her poverty stricken neighborhood, the local school didn't have proper film equipment once she reached high school. Luckily, she met one teacher who introduced her to his personal cameras and taught her how to edit film. After she realized that she wanted to be a filmmaker she set her eyes on the top film school in the nation, USC. This dream seemed impossible because her family didn't have enough money although she had been an entrepreneur since the age of 10. Despite her circumstances, Akeallah managed her businesses, worked during Summers and competed in theatre competitions, all in the hopes to raise money for her dream school. Unfortunately, that wasn't enough and Akeallah was denied from USC in her Senior year of high school. She decided to submit an appeal letter to the university, and in 2012, Akeallah received the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation Scholarship and she was granted admission into the University of Southern California's film school. The Gates scholarship provided a full ride tuition and paid for her to study abroad for a semester in Spain. Akeallah had several internships throughout college at big companies like: Vh1, BET Networks and NBC. After graduating college in 2016, she has worked on major television and film sets as a Production Assistant. Akeallah continues to fight on to her dream of becoming a director. In 2019, she wrote and directed the short film 'The Erasure' , which she raised over $10,000 through crowdfunding. She is currently assisting writer/director John Lee Hancock. In addition to working a full time job she continues to write her next projects.

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Director Statement

I've always felt deeply about the amount of missing women in America, and I wanted to do more than show up at rallies and post on social media. I made The Erasure film to highlight the nationwide discrepancy towards missing women of color. Using my talent to bring awareness to a real issue is the best form of my activism.