Private Project

SOLOMON'S MOOD

SOLOMON'S MOOD is the story of two lovers who've not yet met. Using passages from the ancient Biblical text of Song of Solomon, we see their patient quest for love as their paths cross. Will they each recognize the other as "the one"?

  • Tryphena Wade
    Writer
  • Nicole Moore Joseph
    Director
  • Tryphena Wade
    Producer
  • Jasmine Shanise Gammon
    Producer
  • Tryphena Wade
    Key Cast
    "HER"
  • Kamal Bolden
    Key Cast
    "HIM"
  • Sophia Stephens
    Key Cast
    "BESTIE"
  • Project Type:
    Short
  • Genres:
    Romance, Drama
  • Runtime:
    21 minutes 36 seconds
  • Completion Date:
    March 11, 2023
  • Production Budget:
    20,000 USD
  • Country of Origin:
    United States
  • Country of Filming:
    United States
  • Language:
    English
  • Film Color:
    Color
  • First-time Filmmaker:
    Yes
  • Student Project:
    No
Director Biography - Nicole Moore Joseph

Nicole Moore-Joseph is a writer, actor, and film director. Her most recent short film, 'The Lunch', was featured in the Actor’s Army film festival in Atlanta, GA. Currently, Moore-Joseph is working on funding her personal project, 'Here Lies the Red Bird', a
coming-of-age family drama that depicts her true story and testimony over fantasy sex addiction.

Nicole has studied acting and directing across the United States. She was featured in 'A Piece of Me' at the Producer’s Club and 'Blew', a one-woman show at The Strand Theatre. After working and training in both New York and Los Angeles, Moore-Joseph relocated to Atlanta where she continues taking classes, directing, and teaching.

Committed to giving back, Moore-Joseph served as the VIP Communications Coordinator for the Inaugural Atlanta Black Theatre Festival working with national and international guests. Though she loves acting, she is equally committed to her role as a wife and mother to two daughters.

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Director Statement

One of the greatest joys I have as a director is the moment I realize that I am teamed up with the right crew. That moment, for this film, happened on our pre-shoot day. Myself, the
writer/lead actress, and a handful of the crew, gathered on the beach in the Pacific Palisades for a somewhat impromptu cluster of sunset shots. Despite being delayed because we received our rented camera with a small pre-existing mechanical issue, we managed to get all of the shots we needed within the 30-minute window that was originally scheduled as a 120-minute block of time.

Once wrapped, upon leaving the parking lot, our van took a nasty flat tire. Myself, our DP and best boy, sat on the side of the Pacific Coast Highway (slightly in the road) from 8:30 pm-12:20 am waiting for AAA to show up. As I sat in that van with my two companions, whom I'd just met, I recognized something I had not heard from them. Complaining. Not once, did either of them complain. In fact, it was their lighthearted and sincere disposition that kept me from worrying that we would be sideswiped on this dark stretch of the PCH.

The way they waited kept me from being fearful.

We all made it home between the 1 o'clock and 2 o'clock hour. Our call time was 6 am. They showed up on time, ready to work. That’s the moment I knew that we'd hired some ‘real ones’.

That experience is a tangible example of what drew me to Solomon’s Mood. How well do you handle yourself while you wait? Here are two people ready for love, waiting for love, and neither one of them has been made less than by the wait. Though that’s not the story's main focus, that’s what drew me to it. We live in a time where it is hard for some people to invest in their own wholeness because they are too busy looking for someone to love them when what they really want is to be completed.

I love how these characters cared for their own hearts while waiting, and it shows without showing it. I think it pays tribute to the Writer/Producer, Tryphena Wade. She allowed herself ten years to get this to where she wanted it to be before sharing it with the world. That time of wait added roots to Solomon’s Mood that she wouldn’t otherwise have experienced. Had she complained or rushed, the life of the story would have died.

How we wait, matters. How we wait, affects others. Be it waiting on help with a flat tire, or the timing for the right love.