Alice Street

Two artists form an unlikely partnership to paint their most ambitious mural to date in Oakland’s downtown, ground zero for gentrification. The mural is dedicated to the diverse cultural artists that intersect on the corner, who are threatened by displacement. As the mural paint dries, a luxury condo is planned that will obstruct the art and cultural history. The community decides to fight back.

  • Spencer I Wilkinson
    Director
    One Voice: The Story of the Oakland Interfaith Gospel Choir, Pass Me the Map"
  • 1852 Media
    Executive Producer
  • Spencer Wilkinson
    Editor
    ONE VOICE: The Story of the Oakland Interfaith Gospel Choir, Pass Me the Map
  • Eric Arnold
    Research
  • Micah Berek
    Composer
    Could You Be My Match (2015), ATP Chapter 1: One Day (2012)
  • Axel Herrera
    2nd Composers
    Soledad Is Gone Forever, Manlio Argueta Poetas y Volcanes, Patagonia Rising, We're All Meant to Be REINAS
  • Joseph Chen
    2nd Composers
  • Jay jAswho? Williams
    2nd Composers
    One Voice: The Story of the Oakland Interfaith Gospel Choir
  • Jon Ayon Alonso
    Finishing Editor
    Sombras, Wong is an American Name, Hoodie, The Celine Archive
  • Demondre Ward
    Special Cinematography
    One Voice: The Story of the Oakland Interfaith Gospel Choir
  • James Berek
    Supervising Sound Editor
    NightCrawler, Expecting, Uncle Nick
  • Micah Berek
    Original Music
    Could You Be My Match (2015), ATP Chapter 1: One Day (2012)
  • Ayse Gursoz
    Contributing Editors
    Standing Strong, One Voice: The Story of the Oakland Interfaith Gospel Choir
  • Jesse Andrew Clark
    Contributing Editors
    Winner Winner, Sophie Jones, Reflection Void, Woodstock or Bust, One Voice: The Story of the Oakland Interfaith Gospel Choir
  • Tiffany Mascarenhas
    Contributing Editors
    She's So Into That, One Voice: The Story of the Oakland Interfaith Gospel Choir
  • Demondre Ward
    Contributing Editors
  • Chris Fiorentini
    Contributing Editors
    Generation Gap, Beat Heart Break
  • Spencer Wilkinson
    Primary Camera and Sound
    ONE VOICE, Pass Me the Map, Alice Street Short
  • Ayse Gursoz
    Cinematography
    Standing Strong, Alice Street Short
  • Justin Downard
    Cinematography
  • Korise Jubert
    Cinematography
    One Voice: The Story of the Oakland Interfaith Gospel Choir
  • Anti-Eviction Mapping Project
    Additional Footage
  • Ariel Appel
    Additional Footage
  • Victor Luo
    Translation
  • Jesse Andrew Clark
    Lead Graphics
    Winner Winner, Sophie Jones, Reflection Void, Woodstock or Bust
  • Chromacolor
    Digital Intermediate
  • Darren Hartman
    Colorist
    Get Him to the Greek, More than Only, American Vandal, Dead Envy
  • Alex Panton
    D.I. Producer
    Run Fatboy Run, Closure, Killshot, It Can Be Done
  • Stefan Gustafsson
    Compositor and Animator
    One Voice: The Story of the Oakland Interfaith Gospel Choir
  • Tiffany Mascarenhas
    Stills Compositor
    One Voice: The Story of the Oakland Inter-Faith Gospel Choir
  • Sandra Lawson
    Social Media Coordinator
  • Frederick Marx
    Advisors
    Hoop Dreams
  • Eli Jacobs Fantauzzi
    Advisors
    Inventos, HipLife, Bakoso
  • Halifu Osumare
    Advisors
  • Eric Arnold
    Advisors
  • Peter Bratt
    Content Advisors
    Dolores, La Mision
  • Abby Ginsburg
    Content Advisors
    Soul of Justice: Thelton Henderson's American Journey, Soft Vengeance: Albie Sachs and the New South Africa, Agents of Change
  • Billy Marchese
    Content Advisors
    Relatives, Beyond the Summit, Everest: A Climb for Peace, Haunted
  • Konda Mason
    Content Advisors
    Under the Hood, Pumpkinhead, Margaret Cho: Assassin
  • Braelen Murray
    Content Advisors
    The Science of Stuff
  • Michael Reiter
    Content Advisors
    Agents Unknown
  • Kelly Whalen
    Content Advisors
    Independent Lens, P.O.V, Behind the Lens
  • Daniel Chein
    Content Advisors
    Hoodie, Objector, The American War, Basha Man
  • Mitch Jeserich
    Content Advisors
  • Yoav Potash
    Content Advisors
    Crime after Crime, Food Stamped
  • Jean Mellasaine
    Content Advisors
  • Daniel Zarazua
    Content Advisors
  • Project Type:
    Documentary
  • Runtime:
    1 hour 6 minutes 40 seconds
  • Completion Date:
    January 15, 2020
  • Production Budget:
    150,000 USD
  • Country of Origin:
    United States
  • Country of Filming:
    United States
  • Language:
    English
  • Shooting Format:
    HD
  • Aspect Ratio:
    1920 X 1080
  • Film Color:
    Color
  • First-time Filmmaker:
    No
  • Student Project:
    No
  • Mill Valley Film Festival
    Mill Valley, California
    United States
    October 10, 2020
    Official Selection
  • Urbanworld Film Festival
    New York City, New York
    United States
    September 24, 2020
    East Coast Premiere
    Official Selection
  • Newport Beach Film Festival
    Newport Beach
    United States
    October 1, 2020
    Official Selection
  • Oakland International Film Festival
    Oakland, California
    United States
    September 20, 2020
  • DOCUTAH
    St. George, Utah
    United States
    October 2, 2020
    Utah Premiere
    Official Selection
  • Brighton Rocks Film Festival
    Brighton
    United Kingdom
    August 16, 2020
    European Premiere
    Best Documentary Finalist
  • Social Change Film Festival
    Chicago
    September 24, 2020
    Official Selection
  • Milwaukee Film Festival
    Milwaukee
    United States
    November 4, 2020
    Official Selection
  • Marda Loop Film Festival
    Calgary
    Canada
    October 1, 2020
    Canadian Premiere
    Official Selection
Director Biography - Spencer I Wilkinson

After a decade working with gang-involved and homeless youth in the California Bay Area, Spencer founded Endangered Ideas in Oakland, to focus on stories of resilience.

In 2018, he directed the feature-length "ONE VOICE: The Story of the Oakland Interfaith Gospel Choir" which premiered at the Mill Valley Film Festival, was a "Best Movie of the East Bay" in 2019 and featured on PBS' "Truly CA" 2020 season.

He is the director and producer of ALICE STREET which premiered in 2020. KQED Arts describes ALICE STREET as “set in just a few city blocks, it’s a story about intractable loss as well as collective refusal, depicting artists’ role in grassroots activism that builds power by bridging communities.” ALICE STREET won the Audience Choice Award for Feature Documentary at the Oakland International Film Festival.

Spencer's films have presented at the Urbanworld Film Festival, Newport Beach, Mill Valley, Marda Loop, Oakland International, Milwaukee, Social Change, DOCUTAH, Brighton Rocks and London Rocks, ARTS x SDGS Festival and the San Francisco Latino Film Festival.

Add Director Biography
Director Statement

In 2014, I was living on Alice Street in downtown Oakland, California when I learned two artists were interested in painting a mural just down the street. At most, it was intended to be a short film incorporating community voices and the painting of the mural. This project unlocked a treasure trove of living history that I never knew existed in my neighborhood. The story of Oakland lay inside the intersection where the mural would be painted, and my interviews would shape the content of the piece that I was documenting.

Not only was I immersed in the mural design process, but I became the de-facto videographer for Hotel Oakland, as well as Diamano Coura, one of the oldest Senegalese cultural organizations housed in the cultural center across the street from the mural. (I even made the connection to film a second feature documentary, “One Voice,” through Anne Huang, whom I interviewed for “Alice Street.”)

When the story turned and became a fight to save the mural, I recognized there was a larger story to impart. I had to broaden the focus beyond the two muralists and their artwork to share the community’s struggle to exist within a city that they had helped build but which had no motivation to retain them. A movement was forming amidst the residents I had been documenting and the central battleground between development and displacement was my neighborhood.

Ultimately the response from Oakland’s artist community became a model for engaging cultural artists in the fight against displacement. Gentrification and displacement are taking place throughout the country. The lessons from this story changed my outlook on the power of the arts in community development. I want to share what I’ve witnessed with other communities, hear their stories and continue to collaboratively create models for development that centers the voice of local artists.