Outlaw

Aware that his days are numbered, we walk with the seasoned Jesse James and his young boy through the woodlands of St. Joseph, Missouri, as he proudly recalls his patriotic past. Through his reflections of a time gone by, we come to understand how the seeds of bitterness grew within this acrimonious outlaw. It is upon this jovial hike that we witness this notorious villian through the innocent lens of his son, unveiling a complex and misunderstood outlaw.

  • Rob Levinson
    Director
    Outlaw
  • Rob Levinson
    Writer
    Outlaw
  • Rob Levinson
    Producer
    Outlaw
  • David I Levinson
    Producer
    Outlaw
  • Thomas McCormick
    Key Cast
    "Jesse James"
  • Glenn Robert
    Key Cast
    "Andrew Johnston"
  • Jackson Correia
    Key Cast
    "Boy"
  • Sam Smith
    Key Cast
    "Zerelda (V.O.)"
  • Project Type:
    Short
  • Runtime:
    34 minutes
  • Completion Date:
    February 1, 2018
  • Production Budget:
    1,000 USD
  • Country of Origin:
    United States
  • Country of Filming:
    United States
  • Language:
    English
  • Shooting Format:
    HDV RED
  • Aspect Ratio:
    1.85
  • Film Color:
    Color
  • First-time Filmmaker:
    Yes
  • Student Project:
    No
  • Mystic Film Festival
    Mystic
    United States
    October 19, 2018
    North American Premiere
    Official Selection
Director Biography - Rob Levinson

Hailing from Far Rockaway, New York, Rob Levinson is an independent film director and writer, known for his short film, "Outlaw" (2017) and his award winning 9/11 short play, "Where Were You" (2007). The latter is slated for 2019 release. Levinson has also written the short scripts "A World of Hurt" and "It's Showtime Folks" (an homage to actor Roy Scheider). In addition, Levinson has written the features, "Closure" (2006) and the Holocaust drama "An Unspoken Truth" (2012). Many of his short plays have appeared on stage in the Northeast of the U.S.

Levinson credits his parents saying, "I give thanks to my parents for exposing me to the neverending imagination of film." Levinson said that he was fortunate to have begun his love of film in the mid-seventies, which he considers to be the decade that produced the best visionaries in the world of cinema. Even though he was just a child, those amazing actors awoken within him the power of creativity and exploration. In those early days, Levinson and his older brothers shared that passion for creativity but Levinson also credits his brothers for their high level of patience and indulgence. The three brothers collaborated many times by spending hours with their parents' Super 8 camera, acting out live-action silent, short films. Delving further into their mutual creativeness, they'd often use G.I. Joes along with building sets out of big cardboard boxes. According to Levinson, they'd dress the set right down to the finest of details and film a silent, yet very cohesive story. Those years eventually brought Levinson down the path to the stage. Seeing his brother perform in such plays as "The Man Who Came to Dinner" and "Mousetrap," made him want to become an actor, just like his brother. It wasn’t long before he too let the theatre bug sink its teeth in. That love affair with the stage and screen carried through into adulthood.

"They say it’s never too late to start, and I suppose in some way that holds true for me," said Levinson. After years of writing short plays and feature-length screenplays, Levinson finally decided to put his money where his mouth is and prove to himself that he could make a film, that is of course with the right people. It didn’t take long to write, produce, and direct his short, “Outlaw,” about the infamous outlaw, Jesse James. Along with a crew of three, he filmed ninety scenes in three days. After that rewarding experience and subsequent premier at the Mystic Film Festival, Levinson felt that he was onto something that gave him purpose

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Director Statement

I feel the reward of telling a memorable story is evident in the conversations that follow, once the screen fades to black. I believe every filmmaker, especially independent ones aspire to produce films that are a form of imagery art, not merely a source of entertainment, but rather to provoke self-reflection, with the hope of their work having a long-lasting effect on those who experience them.