Private Project

Things Fall Apart

When a strange, forgotten artifact is shared at a dinner party, it causes a group of old friends to question their loyalties and finally, their sanity.

Shot in only 5 days with mostly improvised dialogue by award-winning writer/director Hussein Juma, "Things Fall Apart" is a unique blend of uncomfortable mumblecore drama and surreal horror film that has been compared to "Primer".

  • Hussein Juma
    Director
    Horse Mask, Pregnant Jack
  • Hussein Juma
    Writer
  • Hussein Juma
    Producer
  • Chengis Javeri
    Key Cast
    Bloodmania, Tin Star
  • Bobbi Goddard
    Key Cast
  • Gina Lorene
    Key Cast
  • Michelle Brandenburg
    Key Cast
  • Camille Shum
    Key Cast
  • Ryan Rollinson
    Key Cast
  • Project Type:
    Feature
  • Genres:
    Horror, drama, mumblecore, mumblegore, thriller, suspense
  • Runtime:
    1 hour 20 minutes
  • Completion Date:
    February 17, 2017
  • Country of Origin:
    Canada
  • Country of Filming:
    Canada
  • Language:
    English
  • Shooting Format:
    Digital
  • Aspect Ratio:
    16:9
  • Film Color:
    Color
  • First-time Filmmaker:
    No
  • Student Project:
    No
  • Obsessive Underground Film Festival
    Hamburg
    Germany
    July 21, 2017
    European Premiere
  • European Film Festival
    Moscow
    Russian Federation
    Official Selection/Finalist
  • Los Angeles Underground Film Forum
    Los Angeles, California
    United States
    Honorable Mention
Director Biography - Hussein Juma

Hussein Juma is an award winning filmmaker that resides in Canada.

He has been making music videos, films and web series for over a decade and has screened across the globe.

Add Director Biography
Director Statement

"Things Fall Apart" is an experience where the horror comes from not only the otherworldly, but also from within the relationships. It was inspired in part by my love for John Carpenter's The Thing, where something (in his film the alien, in mine the mysterious object) causes mistrust and paranoia. I wanted to inject some of the uncomfortableness of a movie like The Celebration into that mix. Having the actors improvise all their dialogue brings a sense of naturalness and makes the audience squirm in their seats at the real horror that anyone can face.