Private Project

Tammy

When an Asian-American skateboarder, who’s either stereotyped or ignored by everyone in her life, is invited to a skateboarding contest, her rare opportunity to shine is ruined by the presence of another Asian-American skateboarder.

  • Andrew T. Horng
    Writer
  • Andrew T. Horng
    Director
  • Andrew T. Horng
    Producer
  • Ino Yang Popper
    Cinematographer
  • Nat Souza
    Prod Design
  • James Karhu
    Editor
  • Donald Hayes
    Composer
  • Wayne J. Horng
    Assoc Producer
  • Show-jen Horng
    Assoc Producer
  • Isabelle Esber
    1st AD/POC
  • Manny Salazar
    2nd AD
  • Michael Wiser
    1st AC
  • Jose Caldera
    1st AC/Gaffer
  • Braulio Espinoza
    2nd AC
  • Alfredo Hernandez
    Sound
  • Dave Wilwayco
    Key Grip
  • Saksham Gumber
    G&E Swing
  • Grant Nakaoka
    G&E Swing
  • Aiko Fairchild
    Consultant
  • Kimon Angelopoulos
    PA/Driver
  • Brian Navarro
    Driver
  • Talia May Smith
    Stunt Double
  • Shuang Hu
    Key Cast
    "The Woman"
  • Sun Park
    Key Cast
    "Seo-Yeon"
  • Val Victa
    Key Cast
    "Danilo"
  • Edmund Truong
    Key Cast
    "Xiaoming"
  • Stephen Schlager
    Key Cast
    "Shawn Mera"
  • Jerina Son
    Key Cast
    "Tammy Tam"
  • Fred Mata
    Key Cast
    "Jack Tam"
  • Susan Kawashima
    Key Cast
    "Diane Ito-Tam"
  • Spencer Weitzel
    Key Cast
    "Rainn Willis"
  • Danny Gomez
    Key Cast
    "Mic "Finnley" Fonseca"
  • Alfredo Hernandez
    Key Cast
    "Alonso Martin"
  • Diane Chernansky
    Key Cast
    "Brea Smith"
  • Kimon Angelopoulos
    Key Cast
    "Jimmy Ambrosia"
  • Kelsey Lin
    Key Cast
    "Lisa Thai"
  • Stephen Yim
    Key Cast
    "Bart Yang"
  • Gihee Hong
    Key Cast
    "Kimberly Park"
  • Project Type:
    Short
  • Genres:
    Dark Comedy
  • Runtime:
    13 minutes
  • Completion Date:
    May 21, 2020
  • Country of Origin:
    United States
  • Country of Filming:
    United States
  • Language:
    Chinese, English, Korean, Spanish, Tagalog, Thai
  • Shooting Format:
    RED
  • Aspect Ratio:
    16:9
  • Film Color:
    Black & White
  • First-time Filmmaker:
    No
  • Student Project:
    No
Director Biography - Andrew T. Horng

ANDREW T. HORNG is a filmmaker based in Los Angeles.  His credits include stints on MALCOLM IN THE MIDDLE, PRISON BREAK, TERMINATOR: THE SARAH CONNOR CHRONICLES, HOUSE M.D. and CURB YOUR ENTHUSIASM.
 In 2019, he was ranked by NYC MIDNIGHT as a TOP 60 FINALIST out of 1700+ writers from around the world.  That year, he also wrote, directed, and produced 4 short films in just 5 months. On the film festival circuit, all 4 succeeded against other films with more time, money, and resources. Mr. Horng's ultimate goal is to improve representation for all underrepresented groups in feature films and TV.

Add Director Biography
Director Statement

“TAMMY” was the craziest production I’ve ever been a part of. There was only 1 week of prep. We shot the film in just 1.5 days. After wrapping, our footage was mistakenly erased. And then, in the hours before the deadline to the HBO Visionaries film competition... our editor had an unexpected seizure and was unable to submit it. “TAMMY” was specifically made for that competition, but suddenly it was not going to be accepted, in heartbreaking fashion.

It all seemed very fitting for our film about internal challenges. And acceptance (or the lack thereof). And yet, looking back... I am so grateful to have gone through that chaos. In the end, we were able to come out of it with a truly unique, Asian-American film that touched upon several more matters. Invisibility. Hatred. Identity. Superficiality.

The competition had initially challenged us to craft a story with a “breaking barriers” theme. My first thought went to the 2020 presidential campaign of Andrew Yang, who at the time had a shot to break barriers of his own and become the first Asian-American President of the United States. During his run though, a comedian made racist, anti-Asian jokes about Yang, and some in the Asian-American community publicly criticized Yang for his forgiving response to the situation. I was fascinated by the dynamic and inspired to write a story based on the idea of an Asian-American outsider trying to break barriers while also dealing with infighting along the way.

In addition to that premise, I wrote scenes inspired by interactions I’ve had both in the outside world and at home. I simultaneously smile and shake my head whenever I hear other Asian-Americans tell me they can relate to those scenes in the film, due to having similar experiences of their own.

As for filming, I decided to shoot this story about race in black & white, mainly due to how viewers tend to judge the look. These days, the majority of films are in color and unfortunately black & white ones are treated differently. Even though a story is a story no matter what it looks like, some folks just don’t give black & white films the same chance as ones in color. If “TAMMY” had been accepted by HBO and shown on TV, we all know there would be viewers opposed to watching it due to the black & white look. Oh, what a superficial world we live in.

--Andrew T. Horng
writer/director/producer of “TAMMY”