Private Project

Stomping Grounds

Portrayed by Bill Milner (iBOY, X-Men First Class, Dunkirk, Apostle, Son Of Rambow) Monroe is a gifted dancer obsessed with being the best he can be. While saying goodbye to his family home, he recalls various fragmented memories in one long, tap dancing-filled dream sequence.

In the present day, a more mature and level headed Monroe is our vessel. Through the corridors of an increasingly temperamental, almost living-breathing house, we witness his downfall and see how his relationships were fractured almost beyond repair.

The film poses to ask the age old question of ‘what went wrong?’ and answer it in a vibrant, experimental way. Whiplash meets Billy Elliot.

  • Bertie Gilbert
    Director
    Harry Potter and The Deathly Hallows: Part Two, Blue Sushi, Rocks That Bleed
  • Bill Milner
    Key Cast
    “Monroe”
    Son Of Rambow, Dunkirk, Is Anybody There?, X-Men: First Class, iBOY, Apostle
  • Amelia Clarkson
    Key Cast
    “Amy”
    Jane Eyre, Our Zoo, Casanova
  • Rebecca Hewett
    Producer
    Jack and Dean Of All Trades
  • Leah Draws
    Producer
    Jack and Dean Of All Trades
  • Ciaran O'Brien
    Director Of Photography
  • Film Type:
    Experimental, Short
  • Genres:
    Drama, Romance, Teen, Psychological, Youth, Short, Dance, Theatre
  • Runtime:
    20 minutes
  • Completion Date:
    February 6, 2018
  • Production Budget:
    20,000 GBP
  • Country of Origin:
    United Kingdom
  • Country of Filming:
    United Kingdom
  • Film Language:
    English
  • Shooting Format:
    ARRI ALEXA MINI, 4K
  • Aspect Ratio:
    2:35
  • Film Color:
    Color
  • First-time Filmmaker:
    No
  • Student Project:
    No
Director Biography - Bertie Gilbert

Bertie Gilbert is a 21 year old director, writer and actor, based in London. He is currently serving as a pioneer for a new wave of young filmmakers, and was recently classified as one of the 'five new Wes Andersons' by DAZED. His whimsical, dramatic and independent films are watched by a global online community of loyal viewers.

His notable successes include short film, BLUE SUSHI, which was funded by Google, and explored the story of a band’s lead singer coming out as trans, and the media’s attempt to manipulate and define one's identity. The film earned significant praise both in the digital and linear world. This was followed up in 2016 with LET IT BE. In 2017, he finished work on the inspirational PLAYGROUND and has recently wrapped on STOMPING GROUNDS - starring Bill Milner.

He is currently developing two full length feature projects, one of which is based upon his short ROCKS THAT BLEED.

Add Director’s Biography
Director Statement

Stomping Grounds at it’s core is a film about reflection and growth. A cerebral study of someone obsessed with their craft.

It's also about important figures in our lives and the lengths we go to keep them around long after they're gone. Monroe's entire personality and outlook on success was born out of the respect and reverence he had for his late mother. As someone who lost his father at a young age, I've often pondered how exactly it's shaped me - for better or worse. How much of my day-to-day life has been informed by my dad and more importantly, by his absence?

A little over a year ago, I moved out of my family home. Looking at it's dilapidated state as I said goodbye was also a huge inspiration. With each room I entered, I saw flashes of various memories - good times, bad. I started pondering the idea of applying this scenario to someone who's mind wasn't as clear as mine. If I'd wronged someone in the way Monroe wronged Amy, I'd struggle to see anything else. The house is a character. It lives and breathes and is the vessel with which Monroe is able to come to terms with his mistakes.

Despite not relating directly to a lot of Monroe's motivations, this film is deeply personal to me. It reflects my growth from angsty teen to more level-headed adult and addresses some stuff in my life that I'm only now starting to acknowledge.

As a 20 year old filmmaker, I've got lots to learn. But with this film, for the first time in a while, I look at it and can confidently say to myself - 'Yeah, I think we're getting somewhere.'