SWIPE

SWIPE is a comedic short film about the digital dating life of Cheryl, a newly-single bachelorette attempting to find love in the Pacific Northwest. Set in the not-so-distant future, SWIPE combines dark technology with light comedy leaving the viewer to think about where we are going with our new-found tech tools.

  • Jeff Schick
    Director
    HALO, HATCH
  • Jeff Schick
    Writer
    HALO, HATCH
  • Steven Laing
    Producer
    Prospect, Redemption Man, No Exit: The Jean Paul Sarte Experience, HALO, HATCH
  • Veronica Long
    Key Cast
    "Cheryl"
  • Alana Noland
    Key Cast
    "Tina"
  • James Clark
    Key Cast
    "Abe"
  • Taylor McKinney
    Key Cast
    "Bartender"
  • Tyler Scowcroft
    Key Cast
    "David"
  • Duncan Star-Boszko
    Key Cast
    "Joe"
  • Phillip Wheeler
    Key Cast
    "Buck"
  • Michael Dreger
    Key Cast
    "Peter"
  • Travis Haysbert
    Key Cast
    "Harry"
  • Project Type:
    Short
  • Genres:
    Comedy, Sci-fi
  • Runtime:
    7 minutes 24 seconds
  • Completion Date:
    January 29, 2019
  • Production Budget:
    12,000 USD
  • Country of Origin:
    United States
  • Country of Filming:
    United States
  • Language:
    English
  • Shooting Format:
    Canon EOS C300 Mark II
  • Aspect Ratio:
    16:9
  • Film Color:
    Color
  • First-time Filmmaker:
    No
  • Student Project:
    No
Director Biography - Jeff Schick

Jeff Schick is a Seattle-based writer, director and filmmaker whose work explores the intersectionality of technology and its utilization by humanity.

With two decades of experience working alongside The Fortune 100, Schick served in branding, digital, social and content production capacities for Amazon, Apple, adidas, AT&T, T-Mobile and others.

Schick began producing and directing films in 2012, ultimately creating film production company, Audio Video Room, where he currently serves as a creative director.

His recent work includes JOSEPH, SWIPE and HATCH.

Add Director Biography
Director Statement

When I moved to a new city in 2016, I didn’t know many people. Freshly single, I turned to dating apps. Over time, I could see the rhythms and patterns me and my dates would fall into. We would tweak, optimize and stage ourselves in ways to be more desired, while preventing each other for who we really are on the inside. We wanted to appear perfect for each other. In the end, I probably went on 100+ dates, dined at every restaurant in the city and was still single.

Adapted and re-written for the big screen, I take a swing at, not only this human behavior of self-perfectionism, but the technology that exacerbates this behavior: dating apps.