Louise

During a street soccer match between four boys, the ball is kicked and falls close to Louise and Bia. Juca invites the girls to play. Iago doesn't accept the girls' participation, but Louise doesn't want to be left out of the game.

  • Amanda Gomes
    Director
  • Andressa Fernandes
    Director
  • Nathanel Cruz
    Director
  • Ana Caroline dos Santos
    Writer
  • Andressa Fernandes
    Writer
  • Amanda Gomes
    Writer
  • Bárbara Pereira
    Writer
  • Diogo Santos
    Writer
  • Fernanda Castro
    Writer
  • Isabella Gobbi
    Writer
  • James de Castro
    Writer
  • Luana de Jesus
    Writer
  • Mayara Pessoa
    Writer
  • Nathanael Cruz
    Writer
  • Sara Moria
    Writer
  • Thauany Souza
    Writer
  • Wriley de Jesus
    Writer
  • Domingos Coelho
    Producer
  • Luiza Camurça
    Producer
  • Project Type:
    Animation
  • Genres:
    drama
  • Runtime:
    5 minutes 43 seconds
  • Completion Date:
    December 4, 2017
  • Production Budget:
    17,609 USD
  • Country of Origin:
    Brazil
  • Country of Filming:
    Brazil
  • Language:
    American Sign Language, Portuguese
  • Shooting Format:
    digital
  • Aspect Ratio:
    16:9
  • Film Color:
    Black & White
  • First-time Filmmaker:
    No
  • Student Project:
    No
  • cinefoot
    Rio de Janeiro
    Brazil
    September 21, 2018
Director Biography - Amanda Gomes, Andressa Fernandes, Nathanel Cruz

Amanda Gomes, Andressa Fernandes and Nathanael Cruz directed "Louise" in Brazilian Sign Language and participated in the scripting of nine deaf films in the "Deaf Culture Circle".

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Director Statement

We based on Chaplin's manifesto "A rejection of the talkies" (1931), Michel Chion's idea of ​​"deaf film" (2003) and Heider and Simmel's experimental animation (1944). Until the beginning of 1930 the films were narrated with images and were called "silent films". The researcher Michel Chion (2003) considers that this denomination may not correctly capture the films produced between 1895 and 1927. Chion prefers to call this production “deaf films” because there was a concern in suggesting the sound in the films such that the role of the audience was mentally complete the sounds suggested by the environment in which the scene and the pantomime of the actors took place. for example, in Charles Chaplin's scene in “City Lights” (1927) in which the young blind woman tries to hand the change back to the supposed rich man, the sound is suggested by the car door being closed and by the movement of the young woman's head towards to the car. The speech is suggested in the famous final scene by the sequence of plan and counter-plan (and that today is part of any soap opera!). In this sense, “Louise” is a “deaf film” because the viewer has an active role in creating the dialogue corresponding to the scenes. In his 1931 manifesto, Chaplin states that "I am confident that the future will see a return of interest of nontalking productions because there is a constant demand for a medium that is universal in its utility". This time came with social networks and the need for universal and inclusive communication: "Louise" was shown on the silent screens of the Brasilia metro for 20 days.