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Kintsugi Angel

Set in an alternate reality, two curious life forms search for social connection. An experimental short film inspired by the emotional toll of COVID-19 and the resilience of the human spirit.

  • Lukas Huffman
    Director
    When The Ocean Met The Sky
  • Lukas Huffman
    Writer
    When The Ocean Met The Sky
  • Erika Senft Miller
    Writer
  • Lukas Huffman
    Producer
    When The Ocean Met The Sky
  • Holly Chagnon
    Key Cast
  • Mireya Guerra
    Key Cast
  • Jude Huffman
    Key Cast
  • Project Type:
    Experimental, Short
  • Genres:
    Sci-Fi, Art, Experimental, Short
  • Runtime:
    10 minutes
  • Completion Date:
    January 12, 2022
  • Production Budget:
    30,000 USD
  • Country of Origin:
    United States
  • Country of Filming:
    United States
  • Shooting Format:
    Digital
  • Aspect Ratio:
    4:3
  • Film Color:
    Color
  • First-time Filmmaker:
    No
  • Student Project:
    No
Director Biography - Lukas Huffman

Lukas Huffman is an award-winning writer and director based in Vermont. Huffman’s narrative feature film, WHEN THE OCEAN MET THE SKY (2016), won more than a dozen awards worldwide and was selected for the Toronto International Film Festival Circuit. He has been commissioned to create films for networks and organizations such as The New York Times, Vice Media, ESPN, The Boston Globe, The National Wildlife Federation, and more. His digital series DEAR FUTURE (2018), won a Webby Award. Huffman's experimental films push the boundaries of storytelling formats and become visual poems.

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Director Statement

Kintsugi Angel started as a creative response to the alien feeling that myself, my collaborator Erika Senft Miller and millions of others are having as we attempt to 'return to normal' while the COVID-19 pandemic rages on. We found ourselves experiencing familiar places and situations as if we were outsiders learning how to navigate dangerous, new environments. These are themes that science fiction cinema engages with. Erika and I sought a poetic way to suggest science fiction tropes and explore what is a timeless human sensation; feeling like an alien in our own broken world. We found inspiration the practice of Kinstugi, the Japanese art of repair, which is used to fix broken pottery.