Grapes Pickles

A young girl is coerced by her favorite toy to work diligently throughout the night turning PopTarts into wine.

  • Kathryn Ann Miller
    Director
  • Kathryn Ann Miller
    Writer
  • Kathryn Ann Miller
    Producer
  • Kathryn Ann Miller
    Key Cast
  • Project Type:
    Short
  • Genres:
    Drama
  • Runtime:
    9 minutes 25 seconds
  • Production Budget:
    500 USD
  • Country of Origin:
    United States
  • Country of Filming:
    United States
  • Shooting Format:
    Digital
  • Aspect Ratio:
    1.0
  • Film Color:
    Color
  • First-time Filmmaker:
    No
  • Student Project:
    Yes
Director Biography - Kathryn Ann Miller

Born and raised in Knoxville, Tennessee (1988-).

2020 MFA, Columbia University, New York.
2017 BFA, University of Tennessee.
2013 BA Anthropology , University of Tennessee.

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Director Statement

Everyday objects and household ingredients are embedded and transformed into my paintings, drawings, sculptures, large-scale installations, and videos. My works are inspired by the wonder and curiosity of child-like perspective and the innate desire to create.

Some of my earliest memories include desperately stuffing objects into an Easy Bake Oven, eating Cheerios from a Centrum bottle in the darkness of the closet, and pretending strawberry-kiwi-scented hairspray could cure blemishes. My grandfather had a small furniture reupholstery business and collected porcelain dolls; great uncle wove baskets and baby bassinets; grandmother crocheted afghans and spun outworn clothes into quilts. Growing up in East Tennessee, America, I was trained to build identity via collecting, consuming, and making.

Inside the wasteful consumption of a commodified society lie elements of primal and cultural survival. There is a predisposition to retreat from threat and danger into an elusive universe driven by impulse and necessity. Not only is nature emulated, it is then collected, brought inside, put on a shelf, or plugged into proximity. Simple functions of manmade products bring comfort and security—but can also illuminate imagination and desire. It is within these constructs that the potential to disrupt the cycle lies.