NEW: Introducing the Festival for Trailers (movie, story, screenplay,  novel etc..). Designed to get your film seen by industry executives and festival directors.

Festival occurs on the first Tuesday of every single month and streams for 24 hours on the WILDsound Vimeo channel. Guaranteed to be watched by 1000s of people.

Trailers for both completed projects and scripts are eligible. They can be for films, scripted and unscripted TV shows, books, web series or games.

The prize is to get is seen by the right people so meetings can occur and/or you can get some waivers by festival directors.

For a limited time we are charging only $20 per trailer submission and EVERY SINGLE submission gets accepted.

NEW: Submit your screenplay/story logline and we'll make it into a video. THEN we will show your film at one of our upcoming Festival for Trailers event:

Send your Video Pitch logline with the relevant information:

Title of Story:

Written by:

Logline: (see below for examples on writing the best logline)

Genre: (choose one of up to five genres) Action, Adventure, Animation, Biography, Comedy, Crime, Drama, Family, Fantasy, History, Horror, Musical, Mystery, Sci-Fi, Sports, Thriller, War, Western (or, choose your own genre)

Type: Short Screenplay, Feature Screenplay, Mini-Series Script, TV pilot, Short Story, Essay, Novel, Play

WGA Registration Number: (if applicable)

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In our opinion, the easiest way to write a good logline is in the form of:

[Film Title] is a [genre] IN WHICH a [protagonist] struggles to [challenge to overcome].

Problematic loglines often use passive language and the word about, which can find you expressing your intentions instead of the action. Something you want to avoid at any cost is a logline that focuses on how you intend the viewer to feel instead of what they’re going to see.

For example (don’t do):

“The Last Thing She Did” is a transcendent human comedy about the way we connect through laughter and memories.

Nice, but it doesn’t tell us a single thing about the script. We don’t know who the characters are, what it’s about, where it’s set, and we’re vague on the genre. When you use a logline, remember you are pitching your story to practical people who want to know if they can make your script into a film that they can sell. Save your beautiful writing for your dialogue, and your writer’s commentary

Every single submission gets accepted.

Accept movie trailers. Screenplay and story trailers.