Existential Therapy

A young man’s inner voice takes on a life of its own; it’s not until he attempts to leave the voice that his true journey of self-discovery begins.

  • Chris Dietrich
    Director
  • Chris Dietrich
    Writer
  • Malibu Taetz
    Writer
    The Substitute, Accidental
  • Ronny Kurland
    Producer
    We're Fine
  • Eric Vincent
    Key Cast
    "John/Other John"
    Ruby, Deep Into Darkness, Twenty Something
  • Olivia Ducayen
    Key Cast
    "Sheila/Other Sheila"
    B-Side, Meant for Something More
  • Project Type:
    Experimental, Short, Student
  • Genres:
    dramedy, fiction
  • Runtime:
    9 minutes 55 seconds
  • Completion Date:
    April 2, 2021
  • Production Budget:
    2,000 USD
  • Country of Origin:
    Canada
  • Country of Filming:
    Canada
  • Shooting Format:
    RED
  • Aspect Ratio:
    16:9
  • Film Color:
    Color
  • First-time Filmmaker:
    Yes
  • Student Project:
    Yes - Capilano University
Director Biography - Chris Dietrich

Chris Dietrich is a director and writer from Vancouver, Canada. His body of work includes music video choreographies, documentaries and dramedies that, more often than not, pose questions of life’s meaning and the quest to find our true selves. He is a graduate of the Bachelor of Motion Picture Arts Program at Capilano University and Japanese Studies at Aichi University in Okazaki, Japan. Chris is also a singer-songwriter, who composed much of the music in this film.

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Director Statement

Existential Therapy is a story of a young man’s inner voice that has taken on a life of its own, as he struggles to find acceptance with it.

The character of John Smith was inspired by my personal experience of living in a downward spiral of negative self-talk. I believe that being inhibited by, not thriving with, one’s inner voice is a dilemma that many people today also contend with.

Existential Therapy, a quirky dramedy, takes its cues from Being John Malkovich, and Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind, as the characters attempt to come to terms with themselves in an otherworldly way.

Unlike those stories though, where it is about a character interacting with others to come to a realization, this story focuses more on John interacting with himself, namely “Other John” to come to an epiphany. “Other John,” is John’s inner voice physically manifested as another identical person.

Although Existential Therapy has elements of a bizarre psychological trip, at its core it is a story of self-acceptance. I am so appreciative of the entire cast and crew who worked tirelessly to make this story come to life. I am very excited to finally have the film seen by others.