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And Will

When Emily embarks on a pilgrimage to Ireland to reconnect with her roots, she realizes that her fiance, Will, isn’t the only thing she’s lost.

  • Rowan Hall
    Director
    Screenplay, Georgia
  • Rowan Hall
    Writer
    Screenplay, Georgia
  • Mike DeMille
    Producer
    Titanium, Georgia
  • Rowan Hall
    Key Cast
    Screenplay, Georgia
  • Louis Normandin
    Director of Photgraphy
    Into the Wild, Monster, Wheels
  • Project Type:
    Short
  • Runtime:
    10 minutes 42 seconds
  • Completion Date:
    September 15, 2017
  • Production Budget:
    20,000 USD
  • Country of Origin:
    United States
  • Country of Filming:
    Ireland
  • Language:
    English
  • Shooting Format:
    RED
  • Aspect Ratio:
    2.35:1
  • Film Color:
    Color
  • First-time Filmmaker:
    Yes
  • Student Project:
    No
Director Biography - Rowan Hall

Practiced writer and classically trained actress, Rowan Hall makes her directorial debut on the timeless Cliffs of Moher. She is best known for her writing on the short, Screenplay and her acting in Georgia, Mount Joy, and Love Knows No Borders. Rowan is currently in post production for her sophomore effort: Quote This!, a short shot entirely on location in Armenia in partnership with the Armenian film commission.

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Director Statement

A filmmaker that I admire once extold that the quality that makes any creation "Art" is singular - It has to reveal something intimate about the person who created it.
I do not know who decides what is "Art" with a capital "A", but I think about those words often. 'And Will' was born from my own recent experience of loss, and the challenge: How little can an audience know about a person's circumstances and still empathize?

When I remember my loss, I am reminded of feeling muted by it; surrounded by people who might have listened, yet feeling unable to speak. In a world in which we are connected at all times to people all over the globe, constantly documenting our moments of triumph and travail, I find more and more that there is a widening gap in direct person to person interaction.

There are emotions larger than a text message or status can capture, and I believe that these feelings force people out of their desk-chairs to the places in the world that feel as old as sorrow or elation. I imagine them to be places where the old gods still live. In discovering Emily's story, I was ensnared by the legacy of the Cliffs of Moher. People travel from all over the world to take their lives at those ancient cliffs. By telling Emily's story there, I met a few of those old gods and learned that saviors are more often mere mortals.