Faggotgirl In Winter

“Faggotgirl In Winter” is the story of two friends thwarted in their travels around NYC because of inaccessible public transport and icy sidewalks. The NYC Metropolitan Transit Authority is required by law to accommodate wheelchair users, and to maintain clear sidewalks and bus stops, These responsibilities often are neglected. This is especially critical in winter, when snow becomes ice or forms a large ridge, preventing people with different movement needs to get where they want to go.

Filmed in New York City, “Faggotgirl In Winter” illuminates the ideology of ableism as it applies to human movement through urban environments. “Faggotgirl In Winter” is part of series of films about accessibility/lack of access throughout NYC's public transportation system.

The protagonist is an action-figure I made of myself, which allows the viewer an opportunity to see the need for more accessible public transport in a new way. Faggotgirl is an icon in the "herald" tradition --- she has social power because of her responsibility to share news with the community.

“Faggotgirl In Winter” has an upbeat soundtrack used with permission of EbonyBones. The film then moves to a description of who/what Faggotgirl is. The setting is a typical NYC winter day, and shortly after a big snow storm. Faggotgirl meets her friend Pinocchio at Grand Central Terminal. They try to walk around Times Square, but the ice and snow make walking difficult, So they decide to travel by subway, but can't get to the trains because the stations have stairways. Next they try to take a bus, but the bus stops are treacherous, snow-packed, icebergs instead of clear passage to the bus door. The movie concludes with panoramic view of the Manhattan skyline, and a call for people to make NYC a great city For Everyone.

Commuters and average citizens do not notice the obstacles that persist for disabled people. With each screening, I welcome the chance to discuss how we can use film to see, and perhaps do something about, all the people being left physically behind in a world that seems ever more in motion.

  • Krissy Mahan
    Director
    "Until Justice Rolls," "Faggotgirl Doesn't Do The MTA," "Faggotgirl Gets Busy In The Bathroom"
  • Krissy Mahan
    Writer
  • Krissy Mahan
    Producer
  • My action figure of myself
    Key Cast
    Until Justice Rolls, Faggotgirl Doesn't Do The MTA
  • Project Type:
    Animation, Documentary, Short, Other
  • Runtime:
    4 minutes 43 seconds
  • Completion Date:
    July 27, 2017
  • Production Budget:
    20 USD
  • Country of Origin:
    United States
  • Country of Filming:
    United States
  • Language:
    English
  • Shooting Format:
    Digital
  • Aspect Ratio:
    16:9
  • Film Color:
    Color
  • First-time Filmmaker:
    No
  • Student Project:
    No
  • 2018 New York Feminist Film Week
    New York City
    United States
    March 10, 2018
    North American Premiere
  • 2015 Official Selection Wotever DIY Film Festival
    London
    United Kingdom
    August 20, 2016
    World Premiere
  • 2018 AltFF Alternative Film Festival
    Toronto
    Canada
    March 15, 2018
    Finalist
  • 2018 Pride Film Fest Chicago
    Chicago
    United States
    November 6, 2018
    Midwest USA Premiere
    Official Selection
Director Biography - Krissy Mahan

Krissy Mahan (they) has been making movies using humor as a feminist tool for 25 years. Mahan’s movies center the social failures around accessibility, gender identity, mental health, immigration, and working class post-industrial cities. Mahan teaches in public elementary schools and modifies homes for elderly, toddlers and disabled people.

In autumn 2018, Mahan's work will screen at Queer Access Film Festival in Berlin, the All Genders, Lifestyles and Identities Film Festival (aGLIFF) in Austin, and as part of the program An Unashamed Claim to Visibility, at the Lesbisch Schwule Filmtage, Hamburg. Mahan's films have been screened at Anthology Film Archives as part of the inaugural Feminist Film Week (NYC), the British Film Institute (London), Union Docs (Brooklyn), Tisch Film School at New York University, BFI's "Queer Women In Love" program (various UK locations), New York University's GenderReel (various locations), Wotever DIY Film Festival (London), SQIFF/Scottish Queer International Film Fest (Glasgow), GAZE Film Festival (Dublin), Creative Quarters Folkstone, Kent (UK), The Cinema Museum, London (UK), Oska Bright program of Leeds Film Festival (UK), Women Over 50 Film Festival, Brighton (UK).

Academic Screenings: International Center For Photography (NYC), Tisch School of the Arts (NYC), University College (London), Kingston University (UK).

Add Director Biography
Director Statement

Millions of dollars of public money have been spent since the US federal government made the Americans With Disability Act Building Requirements national law in 1990, yet multi-million-dollar public transit renovations since then continue excluding certain kinds of bodies.

Among many urban barriers are the hazardous conditions after a snowfall. The NYC Metropolitan Transit Authority is required by law to maintain clear sidewalks at bus stops, but neglects this responsibility. Both of these topics are addressed in my film.

My profession is modifying apartments, I make the living space usable, so that the kind of body that lives there can be safe and independent.

For several years now, I’ve made no-budget films to expose the barriers preventing bodies from going where they want to go, particularly obstacles that occur in urban environments.

Disabled, injured, aging, and just “non-normative” bodies are bodies I care deeply about. I rarely see this topic explored in film, either from an anthropological, social justice, or narrative point of view, so I just make them myself. I welcome the chance to discuss how we can use film to see, and perhaps do something about all the people being left physically behind in a world that seems ever more in motion.

Filmed in New York City, “Faggotgirl In Winter” illuminates the ideology of ableism as it applies to human movement through urban environments. This film in one in my series of festival-screened films about accessibility and the lack of it in NYC's public transportation system. The protagonist is an action-figure I made of myself, which allows the viewer a little room to see this issue in a new way. Commuters seem to not notice the obstacles that persist for disabled people. My short films hopefully bring some attention to these obstacles in a way that is engaging and fun.